Domain extensions

Country domains: a comprehensive ccTLD list

With the rapid global expansion of the internet, an incredible 200 different country domains are now in existence. These are known as country code top-level domains (or ccTLDs for short), and the 200 figure surpasses even the number of countries officially recognised by the United Nations. However, among the existing domain extensions, there are some that are no longer in use. In this top-level domain list, you can find an exhaustive list of ccTLDs and detailed information about special cases. [...]  

Domain check: finding alternatives to a .com domain

What should you do if your perfect .com domain is unavailable? What are the alternatives? New top-level domains provide an answer to these questions. These recently introduced domain extensions give website owners many new, interesting possibilities, meaning you no longer have to rely on the classics like .com, .net, or .uk. [...]  

.swiss: more than just a domain ending

The past few years have seen a range of new domain endings emerging on the scene. Top-level domains like .cafe, .nyc, and .education not only introduce variety and individuality into the internet’s address book, but also allow users to identify companies easily – either thematically or geographically. The new .swiss domain ending allows Swiss businesses and institutions to communicate their affiliation with Switzerland to customers with ease. But what makes the new TLD so unique, and what does that mean for the standard country domain, .ch? [...]  

Exclusive new top-level domains: background and examples

The options for new web addresses with the traditional domain endings like .com, .org, or .net are all but exhausted. Often, companies have to be either very creative or prepared to part with a lot of money in order to land an internet address that really represents their identity and values. These new top-level domains are designed to improve this situation and revolutionize the World Wide Web’s address system for years to come. [...]  

How to avoid problems with the new top-level domains

New generic top-level domains (nTLDs) have been conquering the internet since 2013. Besides abbreviations like .com and .org, and the notorious country codes, website owners now have an even larger choice of descriptive domain endings. Exercising caution when registering is important, since not every abbreviation is intended for general use. In a worst case scenario, your choice of domain could lead to legal dispute. [...]  

Everything you need to know about the new TLDs (top-level domains)

What should you do if your desired domain has already been taken? The range of available .com or .org domains has decreased over the years. Now there is a solution to this problem: new top-level domains! Instead of using complicated and unclear abbreviations, choose short and concise domains from the new TLDs. Local companies can especially profit from nTLDs. [...]  

ccTLDs – what’s the deal with country domain names?

ICANN manages a list of different top-level domains specific to varying geographic regions. The guidelines these country code top-level domains (ccTLDs) follow (examples: .us (USA), .ca (Canada), or .mx (Mexico), are individually determined by their respective countries, leading to some substantial differences in how they are managed. But what other ccTLDs are out there? And what are the consequences of countries like Tonga allowing users to register using its domain regardless of their location? [...]  

gTLDs: what you should know about generic top-level domains

What do the first registered domains from 1985 have in common? They all end with generic top-level domains (gTLDs). Unlike TLDs, which are country-specific, gTLDs focus on international web addresses. There were originally less than 10 different gTLDs, but this number has risen to several hundred thanks to new generic top-level domains. [...]